News

25th Anniversary of First Asynchronous Microprocessor

02-04-14

Twenty-five years ago, in December 1988, Professor Alain J. Martin's research group at Caltech submitted the world’s first asynchronous (“clockless”) microprocessor design for fabrication to MOSIS. MOSIS is the oldest integrated circuit foundry service and one of the first Internet services other than supercomputing services and basic infrastructure such as E-mail or File Transfer Protocol. Professor Alain describes this landmark project in his recent paper "25 Year Ago: The First Asynchronous Microprocessor."

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Caltech Undergraduates Organize Hackathon

01-30-14

Last weekend two thousand top student programmers came together for 36 hours to produce websites, apps, and hardware using open-source libraries and application programming interfaces (API). All code had to be written during the hackathon. HackTech, a partnership between Caltech's and UCLA's networks of hackers and entrepreneurs, was the host of the event which is being called the biggest student-run hackathon ever. [LA Times Article]

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Professor Chandrasekaran Receives NSF CAREER Award

01-24-14

Venkat Chandrasekaran, Assistant Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences and Electrical Engineering, has been awarded the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award for his 5-year project, “Computational and Statistical Tradeoffs in Massive Data Analysis”. The CAREER program is NSF's most prestigious awards for junior faculty members. The level and 5-year duration of the awards are designed to enable awardees to develop careers as outstanding teacher-scholars. Awardees are chosen because they exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

Tags: EE honors CMS NSF CAREER NSF Venkat Chandrasekaran

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

01-06-14

A recent New York Times' Science article about a new computing approach based on the nervous system mentions Carver Mead, Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Emeritus. The new processors used in this approach consist of electronic components that can be connected by wires that mimic biological synapses. Because they are based on large groups of neuron-like elements, they are known as neuromorphic processors, a term credited to Carver Mead, who pioneered the concept in the late 1980s. [New York Times Article] [ENGenious Article about Carver Mead]

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